Bono remembers her mother’s tragic death after collapsing at her father’s funeral

Bono spoke about his mother’s tragic death in a lengthy excerpt from his new book.

Bono Surrender Memoirs: 40 Songs, One Story is due out November 1 this year and sees the musician talk about his rise to fame in his first memoir.

In one chapter of the memoir, Bono reflects on how his mother fell ill at the funeral of his grandfather Rankin, who died of a heart attack on his wedding anniversary.

Bono spoke about his mother’s tragic death in a lengthy excerpt from his new book. Pic: Ludovic Marin/AFP via Getty Images

At the funeral, I noticed my father holding my mother in his arms in a crowd, like a white snooker ball strewn in a triangle of colour. He rushes to take her to the hospital. She collapsed on the side of the grave as her father was lowered to the ground.

“Eris fainted. Eris fainted.” The sounds of my aunts and cousins ​​blow like the breeze through the leaves. “She’ll be fine, she just fainted.” Before I thought, or anyone else, my dad had an Eris in the back of a Hillman Avenger, with my brother Norman at the wheel.

I stay with my cousins ​​to say goodbye to my grandfather, and then we all go back to my grandmother’s little red-brick house, 8 Cooper Street, where the little kitchen became a factory for sandwiches, biscuits, and tea. This one-to-two component with an outdoor bathroom seemed to accommodate thousands of people.

Bono’s Memoir Surrender: 40 Songs, One Story is due out November 1 this year and sees the musician talk about his rise to fame in his first memoir. Pic: Sergione Infuso/Corbis via Getty Images

In an excerpt published by The New Yorker, Bono noted that he and his cousins ​​kept ‘running and laughing’ until his aunt Ruth came and told them his mother was dying after having a stroke.

“Everyone flocks. Eris is one of eight of number 8: five girls and three boys. They are crying and wailing and struggling to stand up. Someone realizes I am here too. I am 14 and strangely calm. I tell my mother’s sisters and my brothers that everything will be Fine

Three days later, Norman and I were brought to the hospital to say goodbye. She is alive but barely. Local clergyman Sidney Laing, who is dating his daughter, is here. Ruth outside the hospital room, sobbing, with my father, whose eyes in her were less than my mother’s life.

The room is at war with the universe, but Eris seems peaceful. It’s hard to imagine that much of it has already left. We hold her hand. Bono writes: There is a crackling sound, but we do not hear it.

In one chapter of the memoir, Bono reflects on how his mother fell ill at the funeral of his grandfather Rankin, who died of a heart attack on his wedding anniversary. Pic: Jeff Vespa/Getty Images for Glamor

Admitting he has “very few memories” of his mother, Bono She revealed that it was “never talked about again” at his father’s, father’s and brother’s home.

He added: ‘I’m afraid it was worse than that. We hardly ever thought of her again. We were three Irish men, and we avoided the pain we knew would come from thinking and talking about her.

Although his homework improved once he began studying at Mount Temple, Bono felt he had “lost all focus” after his mother’s death.

The teachers lamented my coarse handwriting, noting that my father’s letters to them were in beautiful handwriting. While I loved poetry and history, I didn’t feel as smart as my friends. I was afraid deep down that I was mean.

I even stopped playing chess, which I loved, because I started thinking of it as “not cool”. He said I had never had a mother tell me there was nothing “wonderful” about it.

In the excerpt published by The New Yorker, Bono noted that he and his cousins ​​kept ‘running and laughing’ until his aunt Ruth came and told them that an Irishman was dying of a stroke. Pic: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP via Getty Images

Fortunately for Bono, he has been able to get himself back together again through his passion for music and writing. He became one of the nation’s most influential artists.

Describing his mother as a “practical and frugal woman” with “a sense of humor as black as dark curls,” Bono recalled some memories he had of his mother since his childhood.

She can change the kettle plug, she can sew – boy, can you sew! She became a part-time seamstress when Day refused to let her work as a cleaner for the national airline, Aer Lingus, with her best friends from the neighborhood.

There was a big confrontation between them, the only proper class I can remember. I was in my room eavesdropping while my mother patted him with a defensive speech saying “You don’t own me.” To be fair, he didn’t. The plea succeeded where leadership failed, and she gave up the opportunity to work with her colleagues at Dublin Airport.